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Randybias

Jeff,


That's awesome. Is this a replicated or un-replicated object count? I am assuming full replication?

Bucket Explorer

Congrats to Amazon S3.

Zmanda


Awesome! Amazon S3 is extremely scalable and robust store for backup and long term archiving. No wonder this level of growth is being seen.

Scott Shepard

Jeff, quick question in regards to this data. Does these numbers include the Amazon Cloud Storage service? If then all of this isn't storage isn't paid for since you get 5GB free worth of storage. What I would like to know is how many objects are being stored outside of anything related to Amazon's Cloud Drive or Kindle Cloud storage.

Jeff Barr

Scott - We don't break down the numbers to that level of detail.

Spike McLarty

When I plug this into a basic logistic growth model (A Verhulst-style curve fits nicely - I'm assuming the 2006 number is artificially low because that was a short year.), there's tremendous uncertainty about the long-term because you're so early in the curve and the exponential effects dominate. Still, an 'eyeball' fit suggests the object count should grow to at least 1,000,000 billion (1.0E+15) and not start to roll off (stabilize) before 2024. I interpret that as a lower bound, and that growth could run much longer, and reach much higher numbers. It implies doubling or more every year for at least the next 10 years. 2+ trillion objects Q4 2012, 5.6 trillion in 2013. Seems like a herculean infrastructure challenge. Is it even possible relative to world-wide disk drive production?

H D Bolak

I wonder how much of this growth is due to Dropbox ? Can anyone provide a guess ?

Jeff Barr

HD - We would only share this if Dropbox decided to talk about it. So you'll have to talk to them.

Srini Bayireddy

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James

Hi Jeff. Good work! Are you able to reveal how much data that is in terms of bytes? I'm wondering things like... what fraction of the global output of hard disk drives are you using?

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